Poems about IT: Number 2

Broken Controls

existing firewall rules
are ineffective to prevent
intrusion

distributed denial-of-service attack
is launched,
flooding the heart –
causing malfunction,
disconnecting communication channel
with the brain

the heart left open,
love virus gets to work
spreading new sensations
which take deep roots,
taking over controls
in a matter of minutes

by the time
incident report is lodged
and root cause analysis
completed,
the heart’s assets
have been sieged, and the brain
no longer
rules

In computing, a firewall is a network security system that monitors and controls the incoming and ongoing network traffic based on pre-detemined access security rules.
Distributed denial-of-service attack is an attempt to make a machine unavailable to its intended users, e.g. by “flooding” the bandwidth or resources of a targeted system, eventually causing the system to crash. 

Poem by Anna at https://whatthewomanwrote.wordpress.com/2016/01/28/broken-controls/

 

Poems about IT: Number 1

The trick is slick code to manage
all the if, for, and while statements
in a optimized number of lines.
Pass a list, fix the syntax, import all the variables.
Comment your lines and indent where necessary,
leaving line breaks and whitespace
for readability.

— Monica Sharman

Poem submitted as part of  community poetry prompts at https://www.tweetspeakpoetry.com/

Peaceful Soil

Another Biology poem for the collection:

Poetry, Short Prose and Walking

Good roots avoid the sunbeams.
They much prefer the dark
Away from light and sources bright.
They love the mysteries of night.
That’s where they leave their mark.

But leaves prefer the sunlight.
That’s where they dream to toil
And offer all until the Fall
To help their Whole stand true and tall
Then rest on peaceful soil.


“The roots are also incredibly light-sensitive; but in contrast to the leaves, they don’t like light at all.” Stefano Mancuso and Alessandra Viola, Brilliant Green: The Surprising History and Science of Plant Intelligence, Island Press, translated by Joan Benham, 2015, page 50. If you think plants are vegetables, this book is worth reading.

Linked to dVerse Poetics hosted by Björn Rudberg with “soil” as the prompt.
Linked to Imaginary Garden with Real Toads for their Tuesday Platform imagined by Marian.
Photo: “The Details of Blooming” by the author. The scene is…

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“hv” a physics song

h v” by Gilbert Stead (ca. 1920)

Note:v” is the Greek letter “nu”.
To the tune “Men of Harlech” (traditional Welsh tune)

All black body radiations,
All the spectrum variations,
All atomic oscillations
Vary as “h v.”

Ultraviolet vibrations,
X- and gamma-ray pulsations,
Ordinary light sensations
All obey “h v.”

Chorus:
Here’s the right relation
Governs radiation,
Here’s the new,
And only true,
Electrodynamical equation;
Never mind your d/dt2,
V times e or half mv2
(If you watch the factor “c2”)
E equals “h v.”

Even matters calorific,
Such things as the heat specific
Yield to treatment scientific
If you use “h v.”

In all questions energetic
Whether static or kinetic,
Or electric, or magnetic,
You must use “h v.”

(Chorus)

There would be a mighty clearance,
We should all be Planck’s adherents
Were it not that interference
Still defies “h v.”

With thanks to https://ww3.haverford.edu/physics/songs/cavendish/hv.htm

Brief summary of the physics in this song

When Earth Coalesced, Was There Nemesis? Interesting Research Revisited #astronomy #galaxy #stars #poet #poetry #science

Aha! An Astronomy poem….

Kate's Science Fiction, News, and Poetry

Binary stars - inspiration for poets Binary stars are seldom identical

Sol,
A main sequence star
Out in a spiral arm,
Light from your nearest brethren
Falls dimly in your realm.

Bits of rock,
Scraps of gas,
Hydrogen and stone,
Remnants of your origin,
But otherwise
Alone.

It seems that in
Your early phase,
Four billion years ago,
You would have spun a coiling dance
With a twin aglow.

Half such pairs,
Such triples,
More,
Cling and orbit tight,
But others,
Looping, twisting far,
Are lost into the night.

Where does your mate,
Your other half,
reside?
That none can say.
Your splendid self looks down on Earth
The only star
That lights our day.

by Kate Rauner

About 40% of stars have stellar partners, so being alone is not unusual.

Rhyming poems inspired by scienec - at your favorite online store 2nd edition now available! Expanded!

But recent studies indicate that all stars may have been born with companions. Sol may have been paired once, but…

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